Category: General Tech



I had a few students in this week’s 50292 Windows 7 class ask if there’s a list of keyboard shortcuts listed in the book. I’ve just put some on here that deal with the use of the Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key. I decided to point them here and the MSFT official site as well

Windows 7 Keyboard Shortcuts

The following table contains keyboard shortcuts that use the Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key.

 

          Press this key                    To do this

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key Open or close the Start menu.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Pause Display the System Properties dialog box.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +D

Display the desktop.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +M Minimize all windows.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+M Restore minimized windows to the desktop.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +E Open Computer.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +F Search for a file or folder.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +F Search for computers (if you’re on a network).
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +L Lock your computer or switch users.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +R Open the Run dialog box.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +T Cycle through programs on the taskbar.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Start the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number. If the program is already running, switch to that program.
Shift+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Start a new instance of the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Switch to the last active window of the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Alt+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Open the Jump List for the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Tab Cycle through programs on the taskbar by using Aero Flip 3-D.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Tab Use the arrow keys to cycle through programs on the taskbar by using Aero Flip 3-D.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +B Switch to the program that displayed a message in the notification area.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Spacebar

Preview the desktop.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Up Arrow Maximize the window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Left Arrow Maximize the window to the left side of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Right Arrow Maximize the window to the right side of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Down Arrow Minimize the window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Home Minimize all but the active window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+Up Arrow Stretch the window to the top and bottom of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+Left Arrow or Right Arrow Move a window from one monitor to another.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +P Choose a presentation display mode.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +G Cycle through gadgets.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +U

Open Ease of Access Center.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +X

Open Windows Mobility Center.

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There is a really cool event coming up on Oct 14th that I have been lucky enough to become a part of. It’s the Office 2010 and Windows 7 public Experts chat. This is completely open to the public and a great arena to get your specific questions answered! I can’t wait to be a part of this and hope you will too! event details below 🙂

Would you like to learn more about the cool new features in Office 2010 and Windows 7 and what has changed since previous versions? Do you use Microsoft Office but would like to learn tips and tricks to be more productive at home, school or at work? Perhaps you are a new user who has questions on how to get started with Windows 7 or using the Office ribbon? Or would like to learn how to protect your computer from malware and viruses. Or perhaps you are just stuck and need answers.

The Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs) are here to help!

The MVPs are the same people you see in the technical community as authors, trainers, user groups leaders and answerers in the Microsoft forums. For the first time ever we have brought these experts together as a collective group to answer your questions live. MVPs will be on hand to take questions about Microsoft Office 2010 or Office 2007 products such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, Project, OneNote and more. As well as the Windows 7 and earlier versions such as Windows Vista. In addition to Microsoft Office, the chat will cover Windows related topics such as upgrading, setup and installation, securing your PC, Internet Explorer, personalizing your computer desktop or having fun with Windows Live Essentials to share photos, make movies and more. All levels of experience are welcome from beginners and students to intermediate power users.

Please join us for this informative Q&A style chat and bring on your basic and your tough questions!

Join the Chat!

Add to Calendar

October 14, 2010
10:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M. Pacific Time
Additional Time Zones


 

If you’re making the move to Windows 7, Windows Server 2008 R2, and/or Office 2010, you need tools and guidance to help you through the process.  Microsoft Deployment Toolkit (MDT) 2010, a free Solution Accelerator, is designed to fill that need.

The latest MDT 2010 Update 1 release, now available for download, offers something for everyone:

For System Center Configuration Manager 2007 customers:

  • New “User Driven Installation” deployment method. An easy-to-use UDI Wizard allows users to initiate and customize an OS deployment on their PCs that’s tailored to their individual needs.

  • Support for Configuration Manager R3 “Prestaged Media.” For those deploying Windows 7 and Office 2010 along with new PCs, a custom OS image can easily be loaded in the factory and then customized once deployed.

For Lite Touch Installation:

  • Support for Office 2010. Easily configure Office 2010 installation and deployment settings through the Deployment Workbench and integration with the Office Customization Tool.
  • Improved driver importing. All drivers are inspected during the import process to accurately determine what platforms they really support, avoiding common inaccuracies that can cause deployment issues.

Tool is Available HERE


 
    One of my awesome students this week Warren tipped us off to this great piece of reference material. he was having issues with mobile clients and connection speeds. He found this and saw it was an incredible resource when dealing with and understanding Cisco AP’s and their attenae’s!
 

  Today I received some VERY good news. I was awarded the Microsoft MVP award. I knew it was something special, but not how special until I read the post below. If you do the math I am now only one of 0.004% of the IT community! I was nominated by Stephen Rose the community manager for the Windows group and lead of the Springboard team. Thanks so much Stephen! I am happy with my contributions to the community and wish I could do even more, but with family commitments and the need to sleep occasionally, you always just try to do your best. Let me know if there is anything else I can do for you guys! Thanks for reading and the continued support!

Quote

The Microsoft MVP Award Program Blog : Congratulations to the new and renewed Microsoft MVPs
Congratulations to the new and renewed Microsoft MVPsToday over 4000 extraordinary community leaders from around the world received notice that they were awarded the Microsoft Most Valuable Professional Award. The MVP Award recognizes inspiring, trusted, and independent experts who voluntarily share their passion and knowledge of Microsoft products with others. People from nearly 100 countries, speaking over 40 different languages, representing approximately 90 different Microsoft technologies were recognized.Microsoft strongly values it’s relationship with the MVP community. MVPs regularly offer feedback to Microsoft, representing the voices of thousands of people from technology communities throughout the world.MVPs are nominated by other community individuals, or in some cases themsleves. Candidates are rigorously evaluated for their technical expertise, community leadership, and voluntary community contributions for the previous year.The MVP Award is an enormous honor and is reserved for only the most extraordinary individuals. Considering there are more than 100 million social and technical community members worldwide, only a tiny fraction make the cut. (4.0 x 10 -5 if your doing the math.)Welcome once more to the new MVPs, and welcome back to renewed MVPs. We are very excited to recognize your amazing accomplishment!


 

Steve one of my past students tipped me off to this gentleman’s site. It’s a must read!

 

Brian Lee Jackson’s deployment blog!

Do you like DISM, but hate having to use the deployment command prompt? Here is a solution!

Je Jin’s DISM tool


 

    Phil from this week’s 6294 deploying windows 7 class had a great question!

 

         "The data collection package that runs on the clients, how often does it run and can we scheudle it?"

 

    Great question Phil! I thought I would barrage you all with reference information on this one. First off…

 

    How the Application Compatibility Toolkit Data Collector Works

 

    In direct response to his quesiton above I dug up this info…

 

In the When to monitor application usage area, define when your data-collection package will run and for how long, including:

  • Starting: To set the date and the time that your data-collection package will begin collecting data, click one of the following options:
    • As soon as possible after install
    • At specified date and time

Important

ACT uses Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) instead of local time. Therefore, if you set your data-collection package to start at 6:05 P.M. Eastern Standard Time and run for five minutes, the data-collection package will actually start at 3:05 P.M. Pacific Standard Time, 5:05 P.M. Central Standard Time, 6:05 P.M. Eastern Standard Time, and so on. Selecting a specific date and time means that your compatibility evaluators will not begin collecting data until your configured date and time. However, you must deploy your data-collection package prior to your specified time, so it can install your compatibility evaluators.

  • Duration: In the box, type a numerical value that defines how long the data-collection package will run, and then select Days, Hours, or Minutes in the list.

Important

Your data-collection package duration runs in chronological time. Therefore, if you shut down your computer and the specified duration elapses while the computer is off, when you turn the computer back on, the data is uploaded and the data-collection package exits.

  • Upload data every: Select 2 hours, 4 hours, 8 hours, or 12 hours, depending on how long you set ACT to wait between each upload of your application-compatibility data.

Important

If you are running a data-collection package based on the Applying Windows Updates option, we recommend that you select the 2-hour upload option.

 

This info was found here…  Creating a Data Collection Package

When looking bigger picture here on how the tool is used to collect data, use this outline with links here…  Phase 1: Collecting Your Compatibility Data

Or for a real tech deep dive…  Microsoft Application Compatibility Toolkit Data Collector (ACT-DC) Technical Reference


 
     Looking for a quick way to scan your environment for a health check? MS comes through again. This tool came out in fall of ’09 but works fabulous. A previous student Mike tipped me off on this one and said it’s a click to pick! Check it out..
 
 

Overview

The Microsoft IT Environment Health Scanner is a diagnostic tool that is designed for administrators of small or medium-sized networks (recommended up to 20 servers and up to 500 client computers) who want to assess the overall health of their network infrastructure. The tool identifies common problems that can prevent your network environment from functioning properly as well as problems that can interfere with infrastructure upgrades, deployments, and migration.

When run from a computer with the proper network access, the tool takes a few minutes to scan your IT environment, perform more than 100 separate checks, and collect and analyze information about the following:

  • Configuration of sites and subnets in Active Directory
  • Replication of Active Directory, the file system, and SYSVOL shared folders
  • Name resolution by the Domain Name System (DNS)
  • Configuration of the network adapters of all domain controllers, DNS servers, and e-mail servers running Microsoft Exchange Server
  • Health of the domain controllers
  • Configuration of the Network Time Protocol (NTP) for all domain controllers

If a problem is found, the tool describes the problem, indicates the severity, and links you to guidance at the Microsoft Web site (such as a Knowledge Base article) to help you resolve the problem. You can save or print a report for later review. The tool does not change anything on your computer or your network.

 

 Microsoft and Prometric have happily joined forces once again to offer their free re-takes! See below!
 
 
Second Shot provides a free retake when you fail your first attempt at an IT Pro or Developer Microsoft Certification Exam, reducing concern and fear of not passing your exam.

  • Offer Dates: January 13, 2010 – June 31, 2010.
  • Details: Customers must register, obtain a voucher code, schedule, pay, and sit for both the first and (if necessary) second retake exams before June 30, 2010.
  • Eligible Exams: Any Microsoft Learning IT professional, developer (070, 083), or Microsoft Dynamics exam qualifies for this offer, including Academic Exams (072, 094).
  • Eligible Countries: This is a Worldwide Offer, where applicable. Available at Prometric Testing Centers only.
  • Only one Second Shot voucher per purchased exam.

  • Go to the Prometric Web site, call center, or test center. Use your Second Shot voucher number and schedule and pay for your initial exam.
  • Take your exam.
  • If you do not pass, return to the Prometric Web site or visit the call center or test center and use the same voucher number for your free retake exam.
Take Control

IPv6? no, IPv CONFUSING


 
   There is alot of confusion when people see an IPv6 address for the first time. "Why in all that is holy are there alpha characters and what is up with the :’s?" Well the new format is in Hexadecimal not Binary. So we went from base 2 to base 16. From 0’s or 1’s to 0-9 and then A-F! This new 128 bit address space can be rather daunting. I like to think of it in a friendlier way. Now the following is MY interpretation of the addressing and take that with a grain of salt as it may NOT be entirely accurate 🙂
 
    Think of the new address space like a phone number, an international one. v6 addresses are the same. It’s hierarchal in structure. If you want to dial a number in the UK, you dial +044 first. So now in the planet  you know where your calling. Think of the IPv6 address prefix (first 4 positions) to be the equivalent. Just by looking at the first portion of the address you can tell the TYPE of address it is. This is where the similarities fade. You won’t be able to tell WHERE in the world an IPv6 address is, but you can immediately tell what kind it is. We see this same process in IPv4 when looking at things like APIPA addresses (169.254.x.x) and Private non-routable addresses (192.168.x.x, 172.16.x.x, etc..)
 
     Now that this is as clear as mud. Let’s look at some prefixes and get you on the straight and narrow!
 

IPv6 Prefixes

The prefix is the part of the address that indicates the bits that have fixed values or are the bits of the subnet prefix. <– defiinition from Microsoft’s IPv6 document you can download HERE
 

There are three types of IPv6 addresses:

1.   Unicast

A unicast address identifies a single interface within the scope of the type of unicast address. With the appropriate unicast routing topology, packets addressed to a unicast address are delivered to a single interface.

2.   Multicast

A multicast address identifies multiple interfaces. With the appropriate multicast routing topology, packets addressed to a multicast address are delivered to all interfaces that are identified by the address. A multicast address is used for one-to-many communication, with delivery to multiple interfaces.

3.   Anycast

An anycast address identifies multiple interfaces. With the appropriate routing topology, packets addressed to an anycast address are delivered to a single interface, the nearest interface that is identified by the address
 
    Now looking at these types they just happen to be listed in the order of being most common to least common in an infrastructure. We will examine the Unicast addresses here as it’s the most commonly used.
 

  • Global Unicast Addresses

    Global unicast addresses are equivalent to public IPv4 addresses. They are globally routable and reachable on the IPv6 portion of the InternetThe address prefix for currently assigned global addresses is 2000::/3


  • Local-Use Unicast Addresses

    There are two types of local-use unicast addresses:

    1.  Link-local addresses are used between on-link neighbors and for Neighbor Discovery processes. Similar to APIPA addressing in IPv4. Link-local addresses always begin with FE80. With the 64-bit interface identifier, the prefix for link-local addresses is always FE80::/64

    2.  Site-local addresses are used between nodes communicating with other nodes in the same site.Site-local addresses are equivalent to the IPv4 private address space (10.0.0.0/8, 172.16.0.0/12, and 192.168.0.0/16). For example, private intranets that do not have a direct, routed connection to the IPv6 Internet can use site-local addresses without conflicting with global unicast addresses. The first 10-bits are always fixed for site-local addresses (FEC0::/10). These are also re-useable within an organization. Since this can get confusing, Unique-local addresses can be used.

Site-local addresses provide a private addressing alternative to using global addresses for intranet traffic. However, because the site-local address prefix can be used to address multiple sites within an organization, a site-local address prefix address can be duplicated. The ambiguity of site-local addresses in an organization adds complexity and difficulty for applications, routers, and network managers. The first 7 bits have the fixed binary value of 1111110. All unique local addresses have the address prefix FC00::/7
 
Just to round out the remaining types while I type this…
An IPv6 address is easy to classify as multicast because it always begins with “FF”

Anycast IPv6 Addresses

An anycast address is assigned to multiple interfaces. Packets addressed to an anycast address are forwarded by the routing infrastructure to the nearest interface to which the anycast address is assigned. At present, anycast addresses are only used as destination addresses and are only assigned to routers.