Category: Windows 7



I had a few students in this week’s 50292 Windows 7 class ask if there’s a list of keyboard shortcuts listed in the book. I’ve just put some on here that deal with the use of the Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key. I decided to point them here and the MSFT official site as well

Windows 7 Keyboard Shortcuts

The following table contains keyboard shortcuts that use the Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key.

 

          Press this key                    To do this

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key Open or close the Start menu.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Pause Display the System Properties dialog box.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +D

Display the desktop.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +M Minimize all windows.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+M Restore minimized windows to the desktop.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +E Open Computer.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +F Search for a file or folder.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +F Search for computers (if you’re on a network).
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +L Lock your computer or switch users.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +R Open the Run dialog box.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +T Cycle through programs on the taskbar.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Start the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number. If the program is already running, switch to that program.
Shift+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Start a new instance of the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Switch to the last active window of the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Alt+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key+number Open the Jump List for the program pinned to the taskbar in the position indicated by the number.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Tab Cycle through programs on the taskbar by using Aero Flip 3-D.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Tab Use the arrow keys to cycle through programs on the taskbar by using Aero Flip 3-D.
Ctrl+Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +B Switch to the program that displayed a message in the notification area.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Spacebar

Preview the desktop.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Up Arrow Maximize the window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Left Arrow Maximize the window to the left side of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Right Arrow Maximize the window to the right side of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Down Arrow Minimize the window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Home Minimize all but the active window.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+Up Arrow Stretch the window to the top and bottom of the screen.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +Shift+Left Arrow or Right Arrow Move a window from one monitor to another.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +P Choose a presentation display mode.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +G Cycle through gadgets.
Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +U

Open Ease of Access Center.

Windows logo key Picture of Windows logo key +X

Open Windows Mobility Center.


Microsoft has now published a list of OSDX connector files for some of the more popular sites they host and a few others. What is an OSDX file and why do I care? See my preivous post on OSDX connectors for Windows 7

 

good list for sites like..

Bing news

Bing Images

Bing local

YouTube

Yahoo

Yahoo News

Yahoo Images

VL Program guides

Wikipedia

Google blogs

Google News

Flikr

TechNet

MSDN

 

It’s all about being able to search more than just your local pc, all without even having to open up a browser! Our friends over at Bink put up a nice consolodated list of the connectors with links to each’s download page – Enjoy

 

Bink.Nu – MSFT releases search connectors


There is a really cool event coming up on Oct 14th that I have been lucky enough to become a part of. It’s the Office 2010 and Windows 7 public Experts chat. This is completely open to the public and a great arena to get your specific questions answered! I can’t wait to be a part of this and hope you will too! event details below 🙂

Would you like to learn more about the cool new features in Office 2010 and Windows 7 and what has changed since previous versions? Do you use Microsoft Office but would like to learn tips and tricks to be more productive at home, school or at work? Perhaps you are a new user who has questions on how to get started with Windows 7 or using the Office ribbon? Or would like to learn how to protect your computer from malware and viruses. Or perhaps you are just stuck and need answers.

The Microsoft Most Valuable Professionals (MVPs) are here to help!

The MVPs are the same people you see in the technical community as authors, trainers, user groups leaders and answerers in the Microsoft forums. For the first time ever we have brought these experts together as a collective group to answer your questions live. MVPs will be on hand to take questions about Microsoft Office 2010 or Office 2007 products such as Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, Access, Project, OneNote and more. As well as the Windows 7 and earlier versions such as Windows Vista. In addition to Microsoft Office, the chat will cover Windows related topics such as upgrading, setup and installation, securing your PC, Internet Explorer, personalizing your computer desktop or having fun with Windows Live Essentials to share photos, make movies and more. All levels of experience are welcome from beginners and students to intermediate power users.

Please join us for this informative Q&A style chat and bring on your basic and your tough questions!

Join the Chat!

Add to Calendar

October 14, 2010
10:00 A.M. – 11:00 A.M. Pacific Time
Additional Time Zones


There are some known issues when trying to run login scripts on a Vista or Windows 7 machine. This is mostly due to our best friend and worst enemy UAC (User Account Control). Now the UAC is there to protect ourselves,… from OURSELVES! In it’s haste to protect us it can cause havoc when it comes to perfoming login activities like mapping network drives to your servers! An un-recommended method would be to diable or turn off the UAC. This puts a serious hole in the security model that Vista and higher systems leans on. Now this post is specifically for Printer mappings, but a better method is as follows, this can be done via local policy or network based GPO’s..

In your local policy object or the GPMC

clip_image001

Go to Computer Configuration – Adminstrative Templates – Printers

Locate POINT and PRINT RESTRICTIONS  –  Change Status from Not Configured to DISABLED

Click on to APPLY and then OK

clip_image002

Now logged off and log on as the User.  You will now be getting the Printer mappings.


The Windows 7 Application Compatibility List for IT Professionals is a Microsoft Office Excel-based spreadsheet listing software applications which have met Windows 7 Logo Program testing requirements for compatibility with 32-bit and 64-bit Windows 7, and have thereby earned the right to display the Windows 7 Logo Program logo with the application. These products are identified with the compatibility status “Compatible – Windows 7 Logo.”
Additionally, this list includes applications with the following compatibility statuses: “Compatible,” “Free Update Required,” “Paid Update Required,” “Future Compatibility,” and “Not Compatible.” These statuses are based upon the software publishers’ statements of compatibility. These products have not met the Windows 7 Logo Program testing requirements. For an explanation of the various compatibility statuses, please see the Release Notes for the Windows 7 Application Compatibility List.

For the latest collection of compatible applications and hardware devices, please visit the Windows 7 Compatibility Center. You can also leave feedback on compatibility and suggest new products to get added in future reports.

Download details Windows 7 Application Compatibility List for IT Professionals

 

Information found on … BINK – Watching Microsoft Like a Hawk!


     I classified this as Windows 7 since Chris from this week’s 6292 class was asking about it’s use, so here it goes. Also can be used on any OS vista / Server 2008 and up!

     The contents below have been taken from a few sources, most notably THIS technet document

Device installation

A device is a piece of hardware with which Windows interacts to perform some function. Windows can communicate with a device only by using a piece of software called a device driver. Device and device driver installation in Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 operate as shown in the following diagram. "PnP" in the diagram refers to the Plug and Play service running in Windows. If any of the described security checks fail, or if Windows cannot find an appropriate device driver package, then the process stops.

Flowchart - Windows device driver installation

Now how can we use PNPUtil to add drivers into that #3 step??

Steps for staging a device driver package in the driver store

Staging a device driver package in the driver store on the client computer ensures the smoothest user experience. After the signed driver package is in the driver store, Windows considers the package trusted. As long as you do not have a device installation restriction policy in effect for a specific device, the user can simply plug in the device and Windows silently installs the device driver.

Windows includes a tool called PnPUtil that you can use to manage the driver store, including adding driver packages, removing driver packages, and listing the driver packages that are in the store.

ImportantImportant

You can only run the PnPUtil tool from a command prompt that is running with elevated permissions. The tool cannot invoke the User Account Control dialog box. If you attempt to use the PnPUtil tool to add or remove packages from a command prompt that is not running as administrator, the command will fail.

Steps Outline: staging a device driver package in the driver store

Step 1: Attempt to stage an unsigned driver package

Step 2: Attempt to stage a signed, but improperly modified driver package

Step 3: Attempt to stage the properly signed driver package.

Step 4: Test installation of the staged driver package.

Step 1: Attempt to stage an unsigned driver package

Windows interrupts an attempt to install an improperly signed driver package.

To attempt staging of an unsigned driver package

  1. At the Build Environment command prompt with elevated permissions, temporarily rename the .cat file to effectively remove the signature from the driver package. Type the following command:

    Copy Code

    ren toaster.cat toaster.nosig
  2. Attempt to stage the unsigned package. At the command prompt running with elevated permissions, type the command:

    Copy Code

    pnputil.exe -a toastpkg.inf

    The Windows Security dialog box appears because the .inf file is not signed. Windows cannot match it against the certificates that are trusted by the computer.

  3. Click Don’t Install.

    The PnPUtil tool indicates that the staging operation failed:

    Copy Code

    Adding the driver package failed : A file could
    not be verified because it does not have an
    associated catalog signed via Authenticode(tm).
    Adding at least one driver package failed!
  4. Rename the catalog file back to its correct name. At the command prompt, type:

    Copy Code

    Ren toaster.nosig toaster.cat

Step 2: Attempt to stage a signed, but improperly modified driver package

Windows will also interrupt an attempt to install a driver package that has been modified after it was signed. Because the signature includes thumbprints for each file, making a change to any of the files in the package causes the validity check for the signature to fail.

To attempt staging a signed, but modified driver package

  1. Save a copy of the correct toastpkg.inf file. At the command prompt type:

    Copy Code

    Copy toastpkg.inf toastpkg.orig
  2. Modify toastpkg.inf so that its thumbprint is no longer valid. Open it in Notepad:

    Copy Code

    notepad toastpkg.inf
  3. With the cursor at the very beginning of the file, press Enter to add a blank line, and then save your changes and close Notepad.

  4. Attempt to stage the modified package. At the command prompt, type:

    Copy Code

    pnputil.exe -a toastpkg.inf

    Because the package was modified after being signed, the Windows Security dialog box appears, warning you that the signature is invalid.

  5. Click Don’t Install.

  6. Overwrite the modified .inf with the original. At the command prompt, type:

    Copy Code

    Copy /y toastpkg.orig toastpkg.inf

Step 3: Attempt to stage the properly signed driver package

To attempt staging a properly signed package

  1. Attempt to stage the package. At the command prompt, type:

    Copy Code

    pnputil.exe -a toastpkg.inf

    Because the signature attached to the package is valid, the files are unmodified, and the file thumbprints match the signature, Windows successfully stages the package, with no prompts. The output includes the published name with the OEM number that you can use to remove the driver package from the store later, if needed.

  2. Make note of the number assigned to your package.

    Copy Code

    Processing inf : toastpkg.inf
    Driver Package added successfully.
    Published name : oem4.inf

    noteNote

    The number assigned to your package might be different due to the number of driver packages that are already installed on your computer.

You can view the package in the store by running the PnPUtil tool with the -e (for ‘enumerate’) parameter.

To examine the package in the driver store

  1. At the command prompt, type:

    Copy Code

    pnputil.exe -e
  2. Look for the package with your OEM## listed in the output. Make note of this number because you might need it later. You can also see the version number and date that you entered in the .inf file.

    Copy Code

    Published name : oem4.inf
    Driver package provider : Toast´R´Us
    Class : Unknown driver class
    Driver verstion and date : 04/01/2006 9.9.9.9
    Signer name : MyCompany - for test use only


 

    This is for my pal Joe in this weeks 6294 class who was asking some great questions on Sysprep and using Win Sim!

    First of, his new best friend How Sysprep Works 

     What kind of settings and properties can be set using Win Sim? TechNet tells us!

     One of the most confusing parts of using WinSim is knowing which “Pass” to add a setting to if there’s more than one option. This detailed guide explaining the differences between the passes hopefully may shed some light on what the differences are in between the opportunities  Config passes 101

     As cool as this is, we may need some more info on the answer files itself.

     Understanding Answer Files

     Work with Answer Files in Windows SIM

     Walkthrough: Build a simple Answer file (note this is for vista but should be almost identical)

     Advanced Unattended Installation Scenarios

 

The following here shows a (vista) deployment using wim sim step-by-step taken from The Windowsnetworking.com site

 

This present article continues our look at the Windows Deployment Services (Windows DS) server role by walking you through an unattended image deployment onto bare-metal hardware using Windows Deployment Services.

Note:
Readers interested in understanding the basics of deploying Vista using the Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) are referred to the first 13 articles of this series, which are listed on the author’s home page on WindowsNetworking.com.

In the previous article of this series we looked at how to use Windows DS to manually deploy a captured image of a preconfigured reference computer onto a PXE-enabled bare-metal destination computer. This present article examines how to automate this image deployment process by using answer files.

Windows Deployment Services and Answer Files

To perform an unattended image-based deployment using Windows DS, you must create and configure two answer files:

  • Unattend.xml – This answer file is used to suppress the user interface screens of the Windows DS client that are normally displayed at the beginning of the install process. These screens include specifying a locale/language, providing credentials to connect to the Windows DS server, choosing the install image you want to install on the system, and selecting a disk/partition for installation purposes.

  • ImageUnattend.xml – This answer file is used to suppress the machine out-of-box-experience (OOBE) or Windows Welcome screens that are normally displayed at the end of the install process. These screens include specifying a local/language, accepting the EULA, specifying a product key if required, specifying a computer name or autogenerating one, configuring firewall protection level, specifying a time zone, and configuring the network location (Home, Work or Public).

To create these two answer files, you should use Windows System Image Manager (Windows SIM). The sections that follow will demonstrate how to create and configure each of these answer files and then we’ll walk through the steps of performing our unattended install.

Creating and Configuring Unattend.xml

I’ll assume you are already familiar with using Windows SIM. If not, please refer back to article 6 and article 7 from this series. The simplest way to demonstrate how to create the Unattend.xml file for automating the Windows DS client experience is to show screenshots from Windows SIM as follows. First, add the Microsoft-Windows-International-Core-WinPE component for your architecture (x86 in this walkthrough) to the windowsPE configuration pass section of your answer file (refer back to article 3 in this series if you need a refresher on configuration passes). Then configure the settings for this component in your answer file as shown in Figure 1 if you are installing the U.S. English version of Windows Vista Enterprise as we are in this walkthrough deployment.


Figure 1: Configuring locale/language settings for the windowsPE configuration pass.

You also need to specify the language for the Microsoft-Windows-International-Core-WinPESetupUILanguage component as shown in Figure 2:


Figure 2: Configuring locale/language settings for the windowsPE configuration pass (continued).

Next, add the Microsoft-Windows-SetupDiskConfigurationDiskCreatePartitionsCreatePartition and Microsoft-Windows-SetupDiskConfigurationDiskModifyPartitionsModifyPartition components to the windowsPE configuration pass section of your answer file. Specify 0 for the DiskID setting and true for the WillWipeDisk setting as shown in Figure 3 below. This will wipe (delete all partitions from) the first disk on your system and install Vista on this disk using the partition info you provide next.


Figure 3: Wiping all partitions from disk 0.

Select the Microsoft-Windows-SetupDiskConfigurationDiskCreatePartitionsCreatePartition node in your answer file and specify true for Extend, 1 for Order, and select Primary for Type as shown in Figure 4 below. This will create a new primary partition that fills disk 0.


Figure 4: Creating a primary partition that fills the disk.

Next, select the Microsoft-Windows-SetupDiskConfigurationDiskModifyPartitionsModifyPartition node in your answer file and specify true for Active, select NTFS for Format, specify a label and drive letter, type 1 for Order, and specify 1 for the PartitionID setting as shown in Figure 5 below.


Figure 5: Creating and formatting the destination volume for your installation.

Next, add the Microsoft-Windows-SetupWindowsDeploymentServicesImageSelectionInstallImage and Microsoft-Windows-SetupWindowsDeploymentServicesImageSelectionInstallTo components to the windowsPE configuration pass of your answer file. Then select the Microsoft-Windows-SetupWindowsDeploymentServicesImageSelectionInstallImage node in your answer file and specify the filename of the install image you want to install, the name of the Image Group to which it belongs, and the name of the install image as displayed in the Windows Deployment Services console (see Figure 6):


Figure 6: Specifying which install image to deploy to the destination computer.

Now select the Microsoft-Windows-SetupWindowsDeploymentServicesImageSelectionInstallTo of your answer file and specify that the install image you specified earlier should be installed onto partition 1 of disk 0 as shown in Figure 7:


Figure 7: The image will install to partition 1 of disk 0.

Finally, add the Microsoft-Windows-SetupWindowsDeploymentServicesLoginCredentials component to the windowsPE configuration pass of your answer file and specify domain user credentials for performing the install (Figure 8):


Figure 8: Specifying credentials for the destination computer to connect to the Windows DS server.

Validate your answer file and save it as Unattend.xml. Then copy your answer file to the RemoteInstallWdsClientUnattend folder on the image repository volume on your Windows DS server, which in this walkthrough is the W:RemoteInstallWdsClientUnattend folder on server SEA-WDS2. Then, using the Windows DS console, display the properties of the server, select the Client tab, select the Enable Unattended Installation checkbox, click the Browse button for your architecture, and browse to W:RemoteInstallWdsClientUnattendUnattend.xml and click OK. This configures your Windows DS server to use your answer file to automate the first portion of the deployment process (see Figure 9):


Figure 9: Associating the Unattend.xml file with the Windows DS client.

Creating and Configuring ImageUnattend.xml

Now let us create and configure our second answer file, which will automate the Windows Welcome process. Start with a new (blank) answer file and add the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-Setup component to the specialize configuration pass section. Then configure the TimeZone setting, type "*" (asterisk) for ComputerName to autogenerate the computer name of the destination system, and (optionally) other settings as desired as shown in Figure 10:


Figure 10:
Specifying the time zone and computer name.

Now add the Microsoft-Windows-International-Core component to the oobeSystem configuration pass and configure local/language settings as shown in Figure 11:


Figure 11: Specifying the local/language.

Next add the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-SetupOOBE component to the oobeSystem configuration pass section of your answer file and configuring the settings for EULA, network location, and PC Protection as shown in Figure 12 below. (Note that the Network Location setting shown here doesn’t "take" when configured via an answer file and you’ll be prompted to select your network location when you first log on to your computer.)


Figure 12: Configuring OOBE settings for network location, EULA, and PC Protection.

Next, add the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-SetupUserAccountsLocalAccountsLocalAccountPassword component to the oobeSystem configuration pass section of your answer file. Then select the Microsoft-Windows-Shell-SetupUserAccountsLocalAccountsLocalAccount node and create a new local administrator account for the destination computer as shown in Figure 13:


Figure 13: Creating a local administrator account.

And do not forget to specify a password for your new account (Figure 14):


Figure 14: Specifying a password for the account.

Now validate and save your answer file as Unattend.xml and copy the file to your Windows DS server using removable media or some other method. In the Windows Deployment Services Console, right-click on the install image you want to deploy and select Properties, and on the General tab select the Allow Image To Install in Unattended Mode checkbox as shown in Figure 15:


Figure 15: Allowing an install image to install in unattended mode.

Click the Select File button and browse to the answer file you created above (Figure 16):


Figure 16: Select the answer file that will automate Windows Welcome.

Clicking OK creates a folder with the same name (cap3) as your install image file (cap3.wim) and a subfolder named Unattend beneath, and copies your Unattend.xml file to this Unattend folder, renaming the file as ImageUnattend.xml (Figure 17):


Figure 17: Copying the Windows Welcome answer file to the image repository.

Performing the Unattended Install

We’re now ready to perform our unattended install of Windows Vista Enterprise onto our bare-metal PXE-enabled destination computer. Configure your destination computer to boot from the network, turn it on, and press F12 when prompted (Figure 18):


Figure 18: Press F12 to begin the deployment process.

Then when the Windows Boot Manager menu is displayed, select server SEA-WDS2 as shown in Figure 19:


Figure 19: Select the Windows DS server you want to use for your deployment.

Go make some coffee now and have a piece of cake. When you come back, enter your user credentials at the Windows logon screen as shown in Figure 20 and enjoy your game of FreeCell.


Figure 20: The deployment is complete—log on and enjoy your game of FreeCell.


 
    Richard from this week’s 6292 class had a great question and was looking for some more detailed info on using the USMT 4.0 tool with XP to win 7 hardlink migrations. I guess he liked the Springboard series video i showed them 🙂
 
This was taken from THIS ARTICLE on TechNet
 
 

Applies To: Windows 7

You can migrate files and settings while the operating system is offline, by using Windows® User State Migration Tool (USMT) 4.0. For an offline migration with USMT, you do not need to log onto the computer that you are deploying Windows on.

When the operating system is offline, hardware resources and files are more readily accessible by ScanState and other USMT tools. Migrating offline may increase performance on older computers that have limited hardware resources and numerous software applications. It also helps avoid conflicts where a file is in use by another application or service. You may also be able to use an offline migration to recover files and settings if a computer no longer starts properly.

ImportantImportant
Some files and settings that you can migrate in an online migration do not apply in an offline scenario. For more information, see What Does USMT Migrate in the USMT User’s Guide.

In the following example, you modify configuration files for an offline migration, disable Windows® BitLocker™ Drive Encryption if necessary, and then boot into the computer by using Windows PE. Next, you run ScanState to gather files and settings from the current installation of Windows, and then you install Windows® 7 and apply the data from the migration store. This scenario applies to computers running Windows XP or Windows Vista®.

  1. Step 1: Modify the USMT Config.xml File to Include User-Group Membership
  2. Step 2: (Optional) Create an Offline.xml File
  3. Step 3: Copy USMT Files and Tools to a USB Flash Drive or a Network Share
  4. Step 4: Suspend BitLocker
  5. Step 5: Boot to Windows PE
  6. Step 6: Run ScanState to Gather Files and Settings
  7. Step 7: Install Windows 7 and Applications
  8. Step 8: Run LoadState to Apply Files and Settings
  9. Next Steps

You can also migrate files and settings from a Windows.old folder from within Windows 7. In an offline migration scenario where you migrate files and settings from the Windows.old folder, you don’t need to run the ScanState tool before deploying the operating system, and you can run ScanState and LoadState successively. This scenario is discussed further in the Appendix.

Requirements

To complete this scenario, you need the following:

  • Windows 7 product DVD
    noteNote
    Before installing Windows 7, check that your computer meets the minimum hardware requirements for the version of the operating system you want to install. Back up your data files, or save them to a safe location before upgrading. For more information about hardware requirements, see this Microsoft Web site.

  • Windows Automated Installation Kit (Windows AIK) DVD

    You can download the Windows AIK .iso file from this Microsoft Web site and then burn the .iso file onto a blank DVD.

  • Source computer

    A source computer is the computer that you are migrating files and settings from. This computer must have a DVD-ROM drive and a USB port or a network connection. This guide uses a source computer running Windows XP or Windows Vista.

  • Destination computer

    A destination computer is any computer on which you are installing Windows 7 and applying files and settings from the migration store. This computer must have a DVD-ROM drive and a USB port or network connection.

    noteNote
    The destination computer for an offline migration scenario can be the same as your source computer.

  • A technician computer

    A technician computer can be any computer that you install the Windows AIK for Windows 7 on. This computer must have a DVD-ROM drive. After you install the Windows AIK, you can copy the USMT folder to other computers in your organization.

  • Windows PE bootable DVD or Windows PE available through Windows Deployment Services on your network

    For information about creating Windows PE media, see Windows PE Walkthroughs.

    ImportantImportant
    If you are running ScanState on a source computer that has an x86 version of the operating system installed, you must use an x86 Windows PE image. If you are running ScanState on a source computer with an x64 version of the operating system installed, you must use an x64 Windows PE image.

  • A network connection or a portable media such as a USB flash drive

    A portable media or network connection is required for the technician, source, and destination computers to copy the USMT tools and configuration files between computers. You can also use this media to host the migration store if you plan to reformat the computer. For more information about how much space you need for hosting a migration store, see Estimate Migration Store Size in the USMT.chm.

Install the Windows AIK

  1. Insert the Windows AIK DVD into the DVD-ROM drive on the technician computer.
  2. Follow the instructions in the setup wizard.
noteNote
If the Setup program does not start automatically, in Windows Explorer, browse to the DVD drive containing the Windows AIK DVD and then click StartCD.exe. Click Windows AIK Setup to begin the installation.

Step 1: Modify the USMT Config.xml File to Include User-Group Membership

User-group membership is not preserved during offline migrations. You can add a <ProfileControl> element in the Config.xml file to specify that the migrated users should be made members of a user group. In this example, you create a Config.xml file to add all user accounts to the Users group after they are migrated.

  1. Copy the following code into a text editor such as Notepad.

    <Configuration>
    <ProfileControl>
    <localGroups>
    <mappings>
    <changeGroup from="*" to="Users" appliesTo="MigratedUsers">
    <include>
    <pattern>*</pattern>
    </include>
    </changeGroup>
    </mappings>
    </localGroups>
    </ProfileControl>
    </Configuration>

  2. Save the file as Config.xml.
noteNote
If you are modifying an existing Config.xml file, add ProfileControl as a child of the parent Configuration element. The /genconfig command creates an example ProfileControl element that you can modify.

Step 2: (Optional) Create an Offline.xml File

If there are multiple drives that have Windows folders on the destination computer, you can create an Offline.xml file that contains information about which path locations to use. You can use this file when you run the ScanState tool with the /offline option. If the computer does not have multiple Windows folders, you can specify the path of the single folder with the /offlineWindir option at the ScanState command prompt in Step 6.

In this example, you create an Offline.xml file that instructs the ScanState tool to check for a valid Windows directory on the C drive. If no valid Windows directory is found on the C drive, the file specifies to look on the D drive and then on the E drive.

  1. Copy the following into a text editor such as Notepad.

    <offline>
    <winDir>
    <path>C:Windows</path>
    <path>D:Windows</path>
    <path>E:</path>
    </winDir>
    <failOnMultipleWinDir>1</failOnMultipleWinDir>
    </offline>

  2. Save the file as Offline.xml.

For more information about Offline.xml, see the Offline Migration topic in the USMT User’s Guide.

Step 3: Copy USMT Files and Tools to a USB Flash Drive or a Network Share

Copy the USMT tools, modified Config.xml, and Offline.xml files to each computer you are upgrading. In this example, you copy the files to a USB flash drive to transport them to each computer.

  1. Copy all of the contents of C:Program FilesWindows AIKToolsUSMT<architecture> from your technician computer to a network share or a USB flash drive. The <architecture> is either x86 or amd64. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    xcopy C:Program FilesWindows AIKToolsUSMTx86 H:USMTx86

    H is the assigned letter of your USB flash drive.

  2. Copy the modified Config.xml and Offline.xml files to the USB flash drive. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    xcopy C:Config.xml H:USMTx86
    xcopy C:Offline.xml H:USMTx86

Step 4: Suspend BitLocker

If the source computer has BitLocker enabled, you must suspend or disable encryption before you can use the ScanState tool on the drive. For more information about suspending BitLocker encryption, see this Microsoft Web site.

WarningWarning
When you suspend or disable BitLocker, the drive remains encrypted, but the encryption key in not protected until BitLocker is enabled again. If the computer is lost or stolen while in this state, the data on the computer is not protected by BitLocker encryption.

Step 5: Boot to Windows PE

  1. Insert the Windows PE DVD and reboot the computer.
    noteNote
    If you are using a network share to copy the USMT tools or for your migration store, you may need to configure Windows PE for network connectivity. For example, you can use the network shell tool (netsh) or the net use command.

Step 6: Run ScanState to Gather Files and Settings

  1. Copy USMT files to the computer from the USB flash drive or the network. For example, insert the USB flash drive and type the following at a command prompt:

    xcopy H:USMTx86 C:USMTx86

    H is the assigned letter of the USB flash drive.

  2. Set system environment variables for USMT to specify the working directory for the USMT tools and the system architecture. For example, at the Windows PE command prompt, type the following:

    set USMT_WORKING_DIR=C:USMTx86
    set MIG_OFFLINE_PLATFORM_ARCH=32

    For AMD64 architecture computers, set MIG_OFFLINE_PLATFORM_ARCH to 64.

  3. Run ScanState with the /offline option and specify where to create the migration store. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    scanstate c:mystore /offline:c:USMTx86offline.xml /i:migapp.xml /i:miguser.xml /o /config:config.xml /v:5 /encrypt /key:"mykey"

    If you are reformatting the source computer, create the migration store on a network share or portable media.

Step 7: Install Windows 7 and Applications

After you have saved the migration store to a secure location such as a network share or portable media, you can install Windows 7. As a best practice, install applications before loading files and settings from your migration store.

  1. To start Windows 7 Setup, insert the Windows 7 DVD and then reboot the computer. If Windows 7 Setup does not launch automatically, navigate to the DVD drive of the computer and then click setup.exe.
  2. Follow the instructions on the screen to install Windows 7.
    WarningWarning
    You can use an unattended answer file to customize your Windows 7 deployment. For more information, see Step-by-Step: Basic Windows Deployment for IT Professionals or the Windows AIK User’s Guide.

  3. Install all user applications on the destination computer. The application version that you install on the destination computer must be the same version as the one on the source computer. USMT does not support migrating the settings for an older version of an application to a newer version, except for Microsoft® Office, which USMT can migrate from an older version to a newer version.

    For more information about what applications and settings are supported in USMT 4.0, see What Does USMT Migrate?.

Step 8: Run LoadState to Apply Files and Settings

After you install Windows 7, copy the USMT files to the destination computer and then run the LoadState tool to apply files and settings to the new operating system.

  1. Copy the USMT files to the destination computer from the USB flash drive or a network share. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    xcopy H:USMTx86 C:Program FilesWindows AIKToolsUSMTx86

  2. Run the LoadState tool and specify the location of the migration store. You do not need to use Offline.xml with LoadState. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    loadstate c:mystore /config:config.xml /i:miguser.xml /i:migapp.xml /v:5 /l:loadstate.log /decrypt /key:"mykey"

  3. When LoadState has completed, restart the computer.

Files and settings from the previous operating system are now available on this installation of Windows 7.

Next Steps

For more information about deploying BitLocker for Windows 7, see this Microsoft Web site.

Appendix: Offline Migration from a Windows Folder

You can migrate data from an offline Windows folder from a different installation. You can migrate data from a Windows.old folder if you performed an in-place upgrade, or you can migrate data from any offline Windows folder on another computer or another partition.

The ScanState tool includes two parameters that you can use to gather files from an offline Windows folder:

  • /offlineWinDir: WinDir. Specifies the path to the offline Windows folder that USMT uses to gather user-state information. You can use this parameter to point ScanState to an offline Windows folder.
  • /offlineWinOld: WinDir. Specifies the path to the offline Windows.old folder. You can use this option to gather files from a previous Windows installation if you upgrade in-place. For example, you can gather data from a previous Windows Vista installation that is contained in the Windows.old directory.

The following steps show how to migrate files from a Windows.old directory. For more information about using /offlineWinDir:, see the command-line help for ScanState.exe.

You can migrate files and settings from a Windows.old directory from within Windows 7. In an offline migration scenario where you migrate files and settings from the Windows.old directory, you don’t need to run the ScanState tool before deploying the operating system, and you can run ScanState and LoadState successively.

To migrate offline from a Windows.old directory, follow the same steps as the previous scenario, but in the following order:

  1. Modify Config.xml to Include User-Group Membership
  2. Copy USMT Files and Tools to the UFD or Network Share
  3. (Optional) Suspend BitLocker
  4. Install Windows 7 and Applications

    Install Windows 7, but choose the Custom (Advanced) option instead of the Upgrade option. For a hard-link migration, do not reformat the drive. For more information about hard-link migrations, see Hard-Link Migration store.

  5. Run ScanState to Gather Files and Settings

    Use the /offlineWinOld option instead of the /offline option. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    scanstate c:mystore /offlineWinOld:c:Windows.oldWindows /i:migapp.xml /i:miguser.xml /o /config:config.xml /v:5 /nocompress

    ImportantImportant
    If a Windows.old directory is already present on the destination computer before installing Windows 7, the new folder is named Windows.old.nnn, where nnn is a three-digit number such as 000 or 001.

    You can also use a hard-link migration for this scenario. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    scanstate c:mystore /offlineWinOld:c:Windows.oldWindows /hardlink /i:migapp.xml /i:miguser.xml /o /config:config.xml /v:5 /nocompress

    WarningWarning
    When using a hard-link migration, do not format the drive. For more information about hard-link migrations, see Hard-Link Migrations.

    You can use the /offlinewindir option to point to an offline Windows folder. Use this option to migrate from a Windows directory on a different computer or a different partition. For example, type the following:

    scanstate c:mystore /offlineWinDir:c:Windows /hardlink /i:migapp.xml /i:miguser.xml /o /config:config.xml /v:5 /nocompress

  6. Run LoadState to Apply Files and Settings

    Include the /hardlink option in the LoadState syntax as well. For example, at a command prompt, type the following:

    loadstate c:mystore /config:config.xml [/hardlink] /i:miguser.xml /i:migapp.xml /v:5 /l:loadstate.log  /nocompress /lac
    

DISM info continued..


 
     I had an earlier post on DISM Deep dive but what if your looking for something a bit more specific?
 
     Steve-o the cookie monster and Eric the iPhone killer had some good questions today when going through our DISM lab.
 
     "Can you mount more than one WIM file at a time?" – YES!
 
     "if you do mount more than one at a time, does the /get-wimfileinfo switch show ALL your mounted wim data?" – YES
 
      "If your mounting a WIM file with a single build (index), do you really need to use the /index:# switch when using the /mount-wimfile and DISM?" – Tested and confirmed, YES.
 
       STILL looking for more? Found some more good resources..
 
 
 
 

 
     ALOT of enterprise users are having issues with the native Cisco client running safely on a Windows 7 64-bit platform. A colleague of mine (Thanks Jonathan Schwartz!) Tipped me off to this potential work around. *** USE AT YOUR OWN RISK ***
 
How to (Successfully) Install Cisco VPN Client on Windows 7

I have tried many–many different ways to get the Cisco VPN client install on Windows 7–all resulting in BSOD (ndis.sys).  I have found the following procedure has worked 100% of the time on multiple hardware platforms (including VMware):

1.  Install Cisco DNEupdate. – see below

2.  Reboot

3.  Take ownership and delete ndis.sys (in c:windowssystem32drivers).

4.  Take ownership and delete ndis.sys.mui (in c:windowssystem32driversen-us).

5.  Install Cisco VPN Client 5.0.04.0300.

6.  Reboot

7.  Windows 7 will repair itself (should take a few seconds) and automatically reboot.

8.  Cisco VPN Client should work without any other tweaks.

Hope this helps.

Friday, January 16, 2009 12:06 AM by JoshP

# re: How to (Successfully) Install Cisco VPN Client on Windows 7

To further elaborate on steps 6 & 7;

6. Insert your Windows 7 install disc.

6a. Restart into the Windows 7 install when prompted otherwise the OS will go into error recovery.

7. Select your language, time & currency and click ‘Next’.

7a. Click ‘Repair your computer’ at the bottom.

7b. Click ‘Next >’ to start the repairing the OS.

The Startup Repair wizard kicks in and works its magic. How long it will take to repair WILL vary

DNE UPdate

http://www.citrix.com/lang/English/lp/lp_1680845.asp